The naming of Treeton: progress and a request for information

Back in July, I wrote about the difficulty in discovering how Treeton Road got its name.

My enquiry to the Treeton (Yorkshire) Historical Society was promptly answered by Sue Dauris.  With no information at hand, she suggested that a contact in Canada – Shirley Parent – might have the time, interest and experience to follow up the question.

Shirley was born near the village of Treeton and retains a life long love of that part of Yorkshire.   And she is a dynamo in chasing up genealogy and local history.  Her enquiry to Jan Mathews at the newly-formed Margaret River & Districts Historical Society was warmly received but provided little new information. Little (often no) documentation has survived from this part of the State’s history and the naming of Treeton is just one of many mysteries relating to those places that are so familiar to us today. Jan did comment “it is safe to assume that there was a native of Treeton involved, and as there is only one Treeton in England, it must be yours“.

With no written documentation publicly available, the only hope of finding out more would be to track down people who have information through their family histories.

So the next step for Shirley was to contact the West Australian newspaper.  The quote below was published in the ‘Can you help?’ section of the paper on Monday, September 21, 2009 copy of the paper (page 29):

Treeton connections

Looking for descendants of “soldier settlers: who migrated from Treeton in South Yorkshire circa 1922 and farmed anywhere in WA – in particular those who settled in Treeton Road in the Cowaramup area.  Also hoping to hear from anyone whose relatives may have lived or even visited Treeton, in Britain – perhaps during or after World War I or World War II.  They may have come from the nearby towns of Rotherham or Sheffield.

Contact: Shirley Parent, 107-980 Huron Street, London, Ontario, Canada N5Y 5L5.  Email: sparent@rogers.com

Shirley and I would love to hear from you if you have any information: letters, photographs or family stories.

John Simmonds